GenX Teacher Mixes Tech & Teaching

When I was a kid in the 80’s, our school’s technology consisted of Schoolhouse Rock, Mrs. Frizzle, Reading Rainbow and, of course, the classic — Mr. Rogers Neighborhood. Oh and let’s not forget the typing test on our version of 1:1 Tech (ie: a couple of Macintosh PC’s in the actual computer lab) where they put a makeshift cardboard cutout over the keys so you couldn’t cheat your way to 40 wpm.

Image result for old macintosh PC

It wasn’t until college that I had an email address and not until after graduation did I get my very first cell phone.

There’s no question that the advancement of technology has changed the face of education in and out of the classroom. As a GenX Teacher, I’m inclined to use a complementary mix of tech and teaching. In fact, I’m pretty pumped that I can pre-teach explanatory writing on Quizizz, assign an informative article on Achieve 3000, re-teach paragraph format on Kahoot, assess on Accelerated Reader, and require homework submission via Schoology.

It’s definitely a different world.

That’s not to say I don’t see the value in teaching without tech. In fact, just today my students were struggling to grasp the concept of Cause and Effect. We had done the videos and assigned the online tutorials, but there’s nothing can replace engaging classroom discussion and good, old-fashioned teaching.

Teaching is truly an art.

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Terry Tutors Specialized Education Services, Inc. is a 501(c)(3) charitable and educational nonprofit with a focus on providing wraparound academic, behavior and advocacy support services for struggling students in southern California. Learn More at TerryTutors.com

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Support Terry Tutors via Amazon Smile

amazon smileEvery time you hop online to buy books, toys, diapers, pens, ink, a blender, a Keurig, or even a dining room table — they’ve literally got everything — you can now support us!

Amazon Smile accesses the same sites, links and stores that regular Amazon does, but Amazon Smile gives back a portion of profits to your designated nonprofit. A win-win!

As a 501(c)(3) charitable and educational nonprofit, Terry Tutors Specialized Education Services gets back a portion of anything you buy through Amazon Smile. Every time you click “ship”, we get a little of that sale. And a little goes a long way. No donation is too small to help us continue to help struggling students.

Here’s the link: https://smile.amazon.com/ch/81-1498909

Keep on shopping. It’s for the kids 🙂

Keep up with the latest blogs, thoughts and resources. Follow us on Social Media: Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, YouTube

Terry Tutors Specialized Education Services, Inc. is a 501(c)(3) charitable and educational nonprofit providing wraparound academic, behavior and advocacy support services for struggling students in southern California. Learn More at TerryTutors.com

Time Management Tools

Time Management is one of those sneaky, little skills that weaves itself into every class, homework assignment, work load and even our social lives. It’s part of the Executive Functions, which are controlled by the frontal lobe and govern things like control, attention, flexible thinking, working memory, self-monitoring, planning and prioritizing,  getting started on a task, and organization. Time Management is part of the organizational, planning and prioritizing pieces. It is a critical component to student success and one of those all-around skills that we take with us in to adulthood.

A few tools to help with Time Management:

  1. “Chunking”: A terrible name for an awesome tool. Chunking is a method by where a student can set small goals within a limited timeframe. It’s a way a student can feel a sense of completion and accomplishment in a small amount of time. It’s also a great way to gauge whether the student needs a more challenging goal or a more realistic goal.
  2. Self-Assessment: Can the student articulate her strengths and challenges? This is a way to capture the student’s ‘read’ of her self-view. It will also provide insight into confidence and self-advocacy.
  3. Color-Coded Timer: I use the Amco Houseworks Digital Color Alert Timer*. It’s actually a kitchen timer but has three color-coded, “stoplight” settings that help students identify where they are in the process of meeting their timed goal. Find it on Amazon Smiles & make sure to list Terry Tutors Specialized Education Services as the nonprofit you’re supporting.
  4. Sand Timers: For Kiddos who can’t quite tell time yet (whether analog or digital) sand timers are a useful resource for little ones to learn how to gauge their own time. A sand time from a board game works just fine. If you want something bigger and more colorful, try Teacher Created Resources* on Amazon Smile & make sure to list Terry Tutors Specialized Education Services as the nonprofit you’re supporting.
  5. Cell Phone on Airplane Mode: For my older students who may find a color-coded timer ‘too babyish’, we use their cell phone timer but on airplane mode to ensure no calls/texts/distractions throughout our session.

Check out our video for more details about Time Management Tips & Tools: https://youtu.be/4mi_ZAcE68c

*Not paid for recommendations. Just helping parents and teachers find useful resources for their kiddos.

Keep up with the latest blogs, thoughts and resources. Follow us on Social Media: Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, YouTube

Terry Tutors Specialized Education Services, Inc. is a 501(c)(3) charitable and educational nonprofit providing wraparound academic, behavior and advocacy support services for struggling students in southern California. Learn More at TerryTutors.com

 

The Wonder Years of Our Times

wonder years kidsOnce upon a time, kids rode their bikes around the burbs, stayed out till dusk, and checked in for a family dinner at 6 before heading out to cruise the neighborhood again. The family down the block was the family you also barbecued with and there was bound to be another kid in your grade who went to the same school.

Everyone watched out for each other’s kids, growing up and growing old together.

Today, we wouldn’t dare let our children ride their bikes by themselves, let alone stay out till dusk canvassing the neighborhood. And although I’ve seen my neighbors and waved a friendly hello, I’ve never been to their house for dinner.

Things are different today.  Children used to have more autonomy at a younger age. In our modern era, yes, kids still have autonomy, it’s just in a different form. Instead of riding bikes to meet up with your friends at the neighborhood park, technology is their escape. As the tech debate rages on, our kids continue to rewrite history with their iPhones.

Life is lived on the web.

Instead of meeting up at Johnny’s house for sodas before dinner, our kids are group texting or chatting online, blogging about their day and YouTubing about their woes.

Living life alone, together.

I have to admit, although I love my iPhone, I’m a little saddened that I didn’t get to grow up in a time where it was deemed safe and reasonable for me to ride my bike to my friend’s house alone or meet up at the malt shop to gossip about my latest crush.

I realize that yesteryear wasn’t all peachy keen and as a society we’ve made great strides towards for the betterment for all. But I wish I could adopt the good bits of that Wonder Years time — holding onto some of the innocence for just a little bit longer.

There’s a strong nostalgic quality that suddenly takes over when I think about how my parents grew up and how my kids will one day grow up. Maybe it’s not better or worse, maybe it’s just different.

Still, I think technology has unintentionally taken away some of the anticipation, the not-everything-at-your-finger-tips, the waiting.

The wonder of the Wonder Years.

Christine Terry, J.D., is the Founder & Executive Director of Terry Tutors Specialized Education Services.

She created the One Wraparound Service for The Struggling Student, which includes Academic, Behavior, Special Education Advocacy, and School Placement services. Christine truly loves helping struggling students realize their inner potential and the possibilities that await them in and out of the classroom.

Hey Kids, Look Up from Your Phones and Talk to Me!

cell phones and studentsI have a love-hate relationship with technology. I totally get that technology plays a HUGE role in our everyday lives and mostly for the good. I get it. I sincerely do. But ya know, sometimes I actually like using a real pen with real ink to write on real paper.

Born in ’79, I’m on the tail end of Gen X and the beginning stages of the Millennials. I kinda embrace technology but secretly despise it as well. I refuse to be pigeon-holed, just like my generation. And I tend to pass this mentality on to my students, where technology does not play a key role in our tutoring time.

Everyone’s Got their Nose in a Phone

The picture above is a common scene. The great art of life is around us, yet everyone’s got their nose in a phone. For all I know, these kids are looking up the history of the painting behind them or they’re just texting each other about what to do after the field trip is over.

Missing what’s right in front of us is not just the problem of today’s youth. It happens to adults too. For example, standing in line at Starbucks you’ll find that people would rather check their Instagram page instead of striking up a conversation with the stranger next to them, who, by the way, could actually be following their posts and they wouldn’t even know it. Oh, the irony.

In School, Less is More

In general, I’m from the school of less is more: less technology means more independent thinking. You’ve got a question? Great! I want to discuss it with you directly, strike up a conversation that could provoke a train-of-thought, which may lead to a new idea and connect us by thinking about an old topic in a new way.

For that reason, I do not allow cell phones during tutoring time. I think they hurt more than they help during a session. Even on silent, the distraction alone is squandered time and energy. And just like this teen, I’ve also got beef with the efficiency of Ed Tech in the classroom. Finally, let us not forget LAUSD’s Billion Dollar Bureaucratic iPad Debacle. Nine wasted zeros and one superintendent resignation later, the nation’s second largest public school district is still climbing out of this financially burdened technology sinkhole.

Having More Followers does not Mean Having More Friends

Perhaps my frustration as an educator (and even just a human-being living in modern tech-focused society today) stems from the fear that technology will inhibit the organic nature of everyday life.

Technology can aid, but it cannot take the place of real, live, face-to-face connection. I fear our students are missing out on cultivating real connections when we, as the adults in their lives, make technology a priority and rely on its computer savvy in place of our own discernment.

Having more followers does not mean having more friends. Cell phones, tablets, laptops, and whatever the latest and greatest version of these will be in three months does more harm in the classroom than we want to acknowledge. It slowly strips away the authenticity of debate.

Yes, technology is a part of our daily lives (until the digital dark age, of course) but it should not be our whole life, in or out of the classroom.

Christine Terry, J.D., is a Special Education Advocate & Founder of Terry Tutors. She created the One Wraparound Service for The Struggling Student, which includes Academic, Behavior, Special Education Advocacy, and School Placement services. Christine truly loves helping students realize their inner potential and the possibilities that await them: “To be a part of a student’s ‘ah ha’ moment is the best feeling in the world because I know I’m helping that student build foundational confidence that will lead to a successful path, not just in school but throughout life!”