“Patience Young Grasshopper”

Now or later

I love baking. It’s calming, soothing, brings out my creativity and character.

Like tonight, I realized I forgot to pick up bread at the store and decided to try my hand at making it myself. I let the yeast meld with the warm water while I sifted the flour with the egg substitute. Then I added a little salt, some spice mixture and olive oil. Into the oven it went for 17 minutes.

I waited.

As the smell of fresh, homemade bread wafted from the kitchen to my dining room, I peaked inside the oven, poked a few holes to let the steam rise, and put the timer on for three more minutes.

I waited some more.

I waited till I could see the dough turn just a slight brown, knowing that the olive oil seeped through the bottom to create a crisp crust. Taking it out of the oven, I let it rest.

I waited again.

Would it come out all soft in the center? Would it taste good? Should I put butter and jam on it or date syrup?

Finally. It was done.  Not exactly as I had envisioned, more like a scone than a bread, but still, deliciously satisfying.

Waiting is anticipation.

Anticipation is full of a range of scenarios, strategies, emotions, what-ifs, hopes, nerves, and dreams. There’s so much more to the art of waiting than we acknowledge because, in our go-go-go culture today, we do not value waiting. Everything is at our fingertips. With the tap of the “confirm” or “send” or “delivery ordered” button I can buy, watch, and eat most anything, which makes it even more difficult to hone the art of waiting.

Waiting is a skill. A skill that is intended to teach patience. A skill that is becoming harder and harder to teach.

Just like our 24 hour news cycle and our quick social media replies, the quality of what we are saying, what we are doing and what we are portraying and projecting has been replaced with knee-jerk reactions. We are choosing to react instead of act on our own volition.

What can we do about it? How can we change? How can I change to be more artful, more intentional about waiting?

Well, I am learning that slowing down does not mean I will end up last in the race. In fact, it means that I will remain steady and steadfast to the cause. Steady is not boring. It does not mean I have given up or giving in. Steady means that I am stable and stability can bring consistency and appreciation to those aspects of life I may have put aside for a chance to run the race.

As I take this summer to recharge and reevaluate, I vow to also help myself learn to slow down a little more, be a little more intentional about my words, and when I’m ready — after waiting for the right moment — take action.


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Terry Tutors Specialized Education Services, Inc. is a 501(c)(3) charitable and educational nonprofit with a focus on providing wraparound academic, behavior and advocacy support services for struggling students in southern California. Learn More at TerryTutors.com

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Wraparound Support is the Next Big Thing in Education

wraparoundAbout every 10 years the education world shifts its paradigms to support the next big wave in idyllic classroom setting, learning models, and teacher training. We are excited by this revolutionary idea only to find that a decade down the road this new idea no longer does the trick. Education, like any other industry, should be changing and evolving over time. This is a good thing. But the one area where education has never really gone, and perhaps is afraid to venture, is home support. And that is what our kids need most.

Wraparound Support is the Next Big Thing

Wraparound support is a concept taken from the foster care system, whereby each child has a case worker and team of service and support specialists making decisions on behalf of the state and in the best interest of the child. The intention behind this concept is to provide a forum for service providers to openly communicate and thereby make it a little easier to make those tough decisions together. Direct application of wraparound support in our education system would bring about communication, progress, and a vehicle for crossover in-school and at-home services.  It’s the hug of support our kids need.

Let’s Do Away with the “Band-Aid” Model of Education

Currently, we have a “band-aid” model of education. Instead of getting to the root of the issue (ie: a learning difference, behavior challenge, social skills need, or family dynamic concern) we try to patch up our kids with a “he’ll grow out of it” or “she’s just adjusting to this new concept” and hope the wound will heal with no learning or emotional scars. We do this not only in our Education system but in our American health system too, risking our physical health, mental well-being and emotional stability instead of getting the care we need to prevent a crisis.  We send our kiddos back into their home with a formal letter to the parent where the school’s concern is hopefully addressed but often goes unnoticed in favor of “fixing” the most immediate problem– poor grades or disruptive behavior. We don’t have a preventative model of education. Instead, we wait for things to get to the bad zone before help kicks in.

Preventative Care is What Our Students Need Most

I propose that instead of waiting for the other shoe to drop, we anticipate our students needs based on the ton of information we already have gleaned from their in-school reports, records, and behavior and then help their parents implement supports in the home too. A radical idea? Not really. Wraparound services have been part of the foster care system officially since 1997 (CA, SB 163, AB 2706). Unofficially,  attachment-based learning, community education, and the concept of “The Village” have been around since our tribal days. A preventative wraparound model of education is the basis of community support, parent education, and student success in and out of the classroom.

Let’s see what the next 10 years brings about in education reform. My prediction: Wraparound support will make its debut and remain a long-standing run.

Christine Terry, J.D., is a Special Education Advocate & Founder of Terry Tutors. She created the One Comprehensive Wraparound Support Service for The Struggling Student by combining Academic, Behavior, and Advocacy support. Want to Know More? Head on over to TerryTutors.com.

I graduated law school in 2010 and no one was hiring. So I decided to create my own path to success, which began by taking a chance on a Working-Holiday visa overseas in New Zealand and canvassing Auckland for a firm in my field of interest. I found one that was happy to have an American come on board for a bit and I gained valuable international legal experience and made some life-long friends during the year.

When I came back to the US in 2011, the economy was getting better but still in flux and the legal world was still trying to find its way. I hemmed and hawed at what to do. After all, I was in significant student loan debt and, although I had a great analytical and writing skill set, I couldn’t figure out how to apply it to an industry outside of law.

So I fell back on my “before-law-school” skills: Psychology, Nannying, and Tutoring. I was really good at working with kids of all ages struggling in school. As I would sit with these students helping them with their homework, I realized there was a lot more going on here: a learning difference, behavior concern, social skills need, or family dynamic concern. I started putting my law school research skills to use and found that what these kids most likely qualified for was an IEP, which would provide learning services at school and funding through the state. My sister, who is a Speech Pathologist and never has to worry about not having a job, encouraged me to pursue my digging with the caveat that schools don’t like to give away money and it will be an uphill battle. My legal brain was excited. Maybe I could put some of my ADR skills to use too.

I began walking parents through this difficult and emotional process of how to receive state funds and advocating on their behalf at district meetings and appeals. My legal skills gave me a leg up and I finally felt that my law education was being put to good use.

Three years after I graduated from law school, I formalized my new endeavor in the education law world and Founded Terry Tutors, a One Comprehensive Support Service for Struggling Students. I am proud to be an Education Advocate for Special Needs and owner of my own small business.

After law school, it was scary out there because the stability that I had sought no longer existed. I had to create my own job, but I couldn’t have done it successfully without my legal education.

Looks like law school made a difference after all.

– See more at: http://blog.findmylawtutor.com/employment-after-law-school-the-cold-truth/#sthash.7OktCR4Z.vuBFHgZg.dpuf

I graduated law school in 2010 and no one was hiring. So I decided to create my own path to success, which began by taking a chance on a Working-Holiday visa overseas in New Zealand and canvassing Auckland for a firm in my field of interest. I found one that was happy to have an American come on board for a bit and I gained valuable international legal experience and made some life-long friends during the year.

When I came back to the US in 2011, the economy was getting better but still in flux and the legal world was still trying to find its way. I hemmed and hawed at what to do. After all, I was in significant student loan debt and, although I had a great analytical and writing skill set, I couldn’t figure out how to apply it to an industry outside of law.

So I fell back on my “before-law-school” skills: Psychology, Nannying, and Tutoring. I was really good at working with kids of all ages struggling in school. As I would sit with these students helping them with their homework, I realized there was a lot more going on here: a learning difference, behavior concern, social skills need, or family dynamic concern. I started putting my law school research skills to use and found that what these kids most likely qualified for was an IEP, which would provide learning services at school and funding through the state. My sister, who is a Speech Pathologist and never has to worry about not having a job, encouraged me to pursue my digging with the caveat that schools don’t like to give away money and it will be an uphill battle. My legal brain was excited. Maybe I could put some of my ADR skills to use too.

I began walking parents through this difficult and emotional process of how to receive state funds and advocating on their behalf at district meetings and appeals. My legal skills gave me a leg up and I finally felt that my law education was being put to good use.

Three years after I graduated from law school, I formalized my new endeavor in the education law world and Founded Terry Tutors, a One Comprehensive Support Service for Struggling Students. I am proud to be an Education Advocate for Special Needs and owner of my own small business.

After law school, it was scary out there because the stability that I had sought no longer existed. I had to create my own job, but I couldn’t have done it successfully without my legal education.

Looks like law school made a difference after all.

– See more at: http://blog.findmylawtutor.com/employment-after-law-school-the-cold-truth/#sthash.7OktCR4Z.vuBFHgZg.dpuf