The Terry Tutors Annual Report: 2014

2014

As 2014 comes to a close, we’d like to share our Annual Report with you, highlighting our Awesome 2nd Year of Serving The Whole Student!

2014: The Year of Collaboration

We believe that Collaboration for the Next Generation is the way to bridge the school/home gap. We live out that motto by working together with schools, teachers, parents, and therapists to provide Wraparound Support Services. Here are just a few ways we’ve worked hard to work together this past year:

  • The Center for Well Being: Teaming up with Dr. Stephanie Mihalas, PhD, NCSP of The Center for Well Being to Provide School Placement Consulting Services
  • Innovative Speech & Language Pathology: Co-Hosting quarterly Parent-Focused Education Advocacy Workshops – How to Navigate the Regional Center and School District IEPs with Odelia Mirzadeh, CCC-SLP of Innovative Speech & Language Pathology
  • Links We Love: Our Recommended List of Therapists, Schools, and Pediatric Support Providers is growing because we’re out there meeting other support services who can work together to benefit our students too

We Gave Back Over $5,000 to PoP

Terry Tutors shares a global mission of education and supports organizations, like Pencils of Promise (PoP), that believe all children should be given a shot at bettering themselves and circumstances through education. We’re on our way to building a school abroad and have given back over $5,000 to PoP.

Check out how you can Support PoP and Terry Tutors in our effort to build a school abroad together.

More & More IEPs from Los Angeles to San Diego

We’re becoming the IEP Experts, expanding our Education Advocacy service to all of Southern California.

This year we’ve worked with school districts from Los Angeles to San Diego:

  • Helping parents of special needs children navigate the system to get the OT, PT, SLP, SAI, Resource, Accommodations, and Modifications they needed;
  • Mediating communications between the family and the school; and
  • Coming to the IEP Table ready to collaborate in the best interest of the student.

We believe that collaboration instead of litigation is the way forward and do our best to come to IEP Meetings ready to mediate communications and negotiate services and supports in the best interest of our students.

Here’s to 2015!

Thank you for your continued support of referrals, recommendations, and recognitions. Here’s to 2015 and our continued mission of Collaboration for the Next Generation!

“Alone we can do so little, together we can do so much.” ~ Helen Keller, Special Education Student & Advocate

Christine Terry, J.D., is a Special Education Advocate & Founder of Terry Tutors. She created the One Wraparound Service for The Struggling Student, which includes Academic, Behavior, Special Education Advocacy, and School Placement services. Want to Know More? Head on over to TerryTutors.com

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Wraparound Support is the Next Big Thing in Education

wraparoundAbout every 10 years the education world shifts its paradigms to support the next big wave in idyllic classroom setting, learning models, and teacher training. We are excited by this revolutionary idea only to find that a decade down the road this new idea no longer does the trick. Education, like any other industry, should be changing and evolving over time. This is a good thing. But the one area where education has never really gone, and perhaps is afraid to venture, is home support. And that is what our kids need most.

Wraparound Support is the Next Big Thing

Wraparound support is a concept taken from the foster care system, whereby each child has a case worker and team of service and support specialists making decisions on behalf of the state and in the best interest of the child. The intention behind this concept is to provide a forum for service providers to openly communicate and thereby make it a little easier to make those tough decisions together. Direct application of wraparound support in our education system would bring about communication, progress, and a vehicle for crossover in-school and at-home services.  It’s the hug of support our kids need.

Let’s Do Away with the “Band-Aid” Model of Education

Currently, we have a “band-aid” model of education. Instead of getting to the root of the issue (ie: a learning difference, behavior challenge, social skills need, or family dynamic concern) we try to patch up our kids with a “he’ll grow out of it” or “she’s just adjusting to this new concept” and hope the wound will heal with no learning or emotional scars. We do this not only in our Education system but in our American health system too, risking our physical health, mental well-being and emotional stability instead of getting the care we need to prevent a crisis.  We send our kiddos back into their home with a formal letter to the parent where the school’s concern is hopefully addressed but often goes unnoticed in favor of “fixing” the most immediate problem– poor grades or disruptive behavior. We don’t have a preventative model of education. Instead, we wait for things to get to the bad zone before help kicks in.

Preventative Care is What Our Students Need Most

I propose that instead of waiting for the other shoe to drop, we anticipate our students needs based on the ton of information we already have gleaned from their in-school reports, records, and behavior and then help their parents implement supports in the home too. A radical idea? Not really. Wraparound services have been part of the foster care system officially since 1997 (CA, SB 163, AB 2706). Unofficially,  attachment-based learning, community education, and the concept of “The Village” have been around since our tribal days. A preventative wraparound model of education is the basis of community support, parent education, and student success in and out of the classroom.

Let’s see what the next 10 years brings about in education reform. My prediction: Wraparound support will make its debut and remain a long-standing run.

Christine Terry, J.D., is a Special Education Advocate & Founder of Terry Tutors. She created the One Comprehensive Wraparound Support Service for The Struggling Student by combining Academic, Behavior, and Advocacy support. Want to Know More? Head on over to TerryTutors.com.

I graduated law school in 2010 and no one was hiring. So I decided to create my own path to success, which began by taking a chance on a Working-Holiday visa overseas in New Zealand and canvassing Auckland for a firm in my field of interest. I found one that was happy to have an American come on board for a bit and I gained valuable international legal experience and made some life-long friends during the year.

When I came back to the US in 2011, the economy was getting better but still in flux and the legal world was still trying to find its way. I hemmed and hawed at what to do. After all, I was in significant student loan debt and, although I had a great analytical and writing skill set, I couldn’t figure out how to apply it to an industry outside of law.

So I fell back on my “before-law-school” skills: Psychology, Nannying, and Tutoring. I was really good at working with kids of all ages struggling in school. As I would sit with these students helping them with their homework, I realized there was a lot more going on here: a learning difference, behavior concern, social skills need, or family dynamic concern. I started putting my law school research skills to use and found that what these kids most likely qualified for was an IEP, which would provide learning services at school and funding through the state. My sister, who is a Speech Pathologist and never has to worry about not having a job, encouraged me to pursue my digging with the caveat that schools don’t like to give away money and it will be an uphill battle. My legal brain was excited. Maybe I could put some of my ADR skills to use too.

I began walking parents through this difficult and emotional process of how to receive state funds and advocating on their behalf at district meetings and appeals. My legal skills gave me a leg up and I finally felt that my law education was being put to good use.

Three years after I graduated from law school, I formalized my new endeavor in the education law world and Founded Terry Tutors, a One Comprehensive Support Service for Struggling Students. I am proud to be an Education Advocate for Special Needs and owner of my own small business.

After law school, it was scary out there because the stability that I had sought no longer existed. I had to create my own job, but I couldn’t have done it successfully without my legal education.

Looks like law school made a difference after all.

– See more at: http://blog.findmylawtutor.com/employment-after-law-school-the-cold-truth/#sthash.7OktCR4Z.vuBFHgZg.dpuf

I graduated law school in 2010 and no one was hiring. So I decided to create my own path to success, which began by taking a chance on a Working-Holiday visa overseas in New Zealand and canvassing Auckland for a firm in my field of interest. I found one that was happy to have an American come on board for a bit and I gained valuable international legal experience and made some life-long friends during the year.

When I came back to the US in 2011, the economy was getting better but still in flux and the legal world was still trying to find its way. I hemmed and hawed at what to do. After all, I was in significant student loan debt and, although I had a great analytical and writing skill set, I couldn’t figure out how to apply it to an industry outside of law.

So I fell back on my “before-law-school” skills: Psychology, Nannying, and Tutoring. I was really good at working with kids of all ages struggling in school. As I would sit with these students helping them with their homework, I realized there was a lot more going on here: a learning difference, behavior concern, social skills need, or family dynamic concern. I started putting my law school research skills to use and found that what these kids most likely qualified for was an IEP, which would provide learning services at school and funding through the state. My sister, who is a Speech Pathologist and never has to worry about not having a job, encouraged me to pursue my digging with the caveat that schools don’t like to give away money and it will be an uphill battle. My legal brain was excited. Maybe I could put some of my ADR skills to use too.

I began walking parents through this difficult and emotional process of how to receive state funds and advocating on their behalf at district meetings and appeals. My legal skills gave me a leg up and I finally felt that my law education was being put to good use.

Three years after I graduated from law school, I formalized my new endeavor in the education law world and Founded Terry Tutors, a One Comprehensive Support Service for Struggling Students. I am proud to be an Education Advocate for Special Needs and owner of my own small business.

After law school, it was scary out there because the stability that I had sought no longer existed. I had to create my own job, but I couldn’t have done it successfully without my legal education.

Looks like law school made a difference after all.

– See more at: http://blog.findmylawtutor.com/employment-after-law-school-the-cold-truth/#sthash.7OktCR4Z.vuBFHgZg.dpuf